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 Cataract?
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Pollyparty

26 Posts

Posted - 10/23/2006 :  7:57:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit Pollyparty's Homepage
Help please...I have a 3 week old female. Yesterday morning it was business as usual, feed weigh etc. Last night, I went to the barn to feed and do nighttime checks and noticed her eye looked odd. On closer evaluation there was a white spot covering her pupil. I telephoned the vet, he came over and gave me some antibiotic ointment to treat her with. She was treated last night and again this morning.The vet was here to see her this afternoon and gave me another ointment for her eye. He now says he thinks it is a cataract, but really needs to dialate the eye for a closer look.

I am so upset. This is one of my first babies, 3 in all this year, we lost our first one.

If anyone had any information on this please let me know.

Thanks,

Rhonda Green
Alpacas at Bear Creek
Astoria, OR.

allamericanalpacas

4245 Posts

Posted - 10/23/2006 :  8:02:39 PM  Show Profile
Eye problems are quite common, we just finished one up, we found the eye clouded over, it's now fine.
Our vet has us start with 3x daily triple antibiotic ointment and once daily atropine to dilate the eye.
On one, it was slow to clear up so it was cultured, we switched antibiotics, and 3 days later it was good.

Rick
--
Rick & Pati Horn
All American Alpacas
35215 Avenida Maņana
Murrieta, Ca. 92563
http://aaalpacas.com/updates.html
http://alpacanation.com/aaalpacas.asp
(951) 679-7795
Life is good!
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Dawn

284 Posts

Posted - 10/23/2006 :  10:23:02 PM  Show Profile  Visit Dawn's Homepage
We just had the same problem here with our boarder's newborn male that scratched his eye somehow. He was only about 2 hours old when we noticed the greyish spot on his eye. I took him and mom to the vet for a check up and she put a paper up to his eye that looked like those strips that test PH. It turned his eyes green and showed the scratch when she shined the light on it. She gave us Atropine to use until the pupil fully dialated and vetropolycin ointment to use until it heals. He's now 9 days old and doing fine.

Dawn

Dawn Dolpp
Mada Vemi Alpacas
Axton, VA
www.alpacanation.com/madavemialpacas.asp
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nyala

3320 Posts

Posted - 10/23/2006 :  10:53:38 PM  Show Profile  Visit nyala's Homepage
Hey Ronda,
Cataracts are VERY common in alpacas. We don't know if they are all genetic or if some are environmentally caused. If they are born with them, and don't clear up, I tend to suspect they are genetic. Usually vets can stain the ey to see if it is an ulcer or if the eye is swollen with too much fluid or other problems that can make it look cloudy. Hopefully it is only one of those problems. If it is cataracts please consider sending blood samples from the cria, dam and sire (and any blood relatives) for my mapping of genetic traits in alpacas study. Email me at andym@binghamton.edu if you have any questions. Hope it works out.
Best of luck.
Andy Merriwether
Nyala Farm Alpacas
and
Binghamton University

quote:
Originally posted by Pollyparty

Help please...I have a 3 week old female. Yesterday morning it was business as usual, feed weigh etc. Last night, I went to the barn to feed and do nighttime checks and noticed her eye looked odd. On closer evaluation there was a white spot covering her pupil. I telephoned the vet, he came over and gave me some antibiotic ointment to treat her with. She was treated last night and again this morning.The vet was here to see her this afternoon and gave me another ointment for her eye. He now says he thinks it is a cataract, but really needs to dialate the eye for a closer look.

I am so upset. This is one of my first babies, 3 in all this year, we lost our first one.

If anyone had any information on this please let me know.

Thanks,

Rhonda Green
Alpacas at Bear Creek
Astoria, OR.



D. Andrew Merriwether, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Anthropology and Biology
Binghamton Univeristy
and
Nyala Farm Alpacas
Vestal, NY
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renfarms

442 Posts

Posted - 10/24/2006 :  12:08:10 AM  Show Profile  Visit renfarms's Homepage
Hi all!
Just a related note. I believe the atropine is initially given at the time of examination to dilate the eye and aid in diagnosis. The subsequent administrations of it are as a pain reliever. We had a yearling with a weepy eye treated at Ohio State last summer - no scratches showed up on the cornea after using the green staining agent, and the best guess diagnosis on their part was possibly a virus (possibly something like herpes simplex). Two other things that are useful to know: sometimes an eye problem can take up to several weeks to clear up, so be patient, and secondly, if you are administering atropine it is important to be sure that you keep the animal out of direct sunlight as much as possible, since the pupil will be fully dilated by the atropine and there is some risk of retinal damage if they get too much direct sunlight into that dilated pupil. After 3 weeks, our girl recovered fully and has not had any subsequent problems.
Good luck with your cria, Rhonda!
Bill

Bill and Louise Goebel
Renaissance Farms
McArthur, Ohio 45651
(740) 596-1468
renfarms@starband.net
www.alpacanation.com/renaissancefarms.asp
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allamericanalpacas

4245 Posts

Posted - 10/24/2006 :  01:26:01 AM  Show Profile
I do believe that the atropine is to prevent adhesions. Our vet does ask that we gine it at sunset, though it does last 2-3 days. The ones that get it do tend to hide from the sun by themselves

Rick
--
Rick & Pati Horn
All American Alpacas
35215 Avenida Maņana
Murrieta, Ca. 92563
http://aaalpacas.com/updates.html
http://alpacanation.com/aaalpacas.asp
(951) 679-7795
Life is good!
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renfarms

442 Posts

Posted - 10/24/2006 :  02:03:10 AM  Show Profile  Visit renfarms's Homepage
I forgot to mention the other reason for subsequent atropine besides pain relief. Yes, Rick, it does also prevent adhesions between the lens and the iris. It has multiple affects when applied to the eye!
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/medmaster/a682487.html
http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/medicines/100003528.html
Bill


Bill and Louise Goebel
Renaissance Farms
McArthur, Ohio 45651
(740) 596-1468
renfarms@starband.net
www.alpacanation.com/renaissancefarms.asp

Edited by - renfarms on 10/24/2006 02:39:57 AM
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Pollyparty

26 Posts

Posted - 10/25/2006 :  3:34:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit Pollyparty's Homepage
Cataract continued...

The vet came out and dialted her eye, and said it was definatly a cataract. There was no green liquid in the eye to check for an abrasion just a flashlight to see if the pupil will dilate with light and dark, it does.

When I asked if there was anything I could do I was told "no, these things are pretty much congenital and since there is not alot of culling going on, we can expect defects like this."

I am wondering if I should continue with the antibiotic "vetropolycin" which is what he initially gave me. I mean can it hurt her? I would rather think I did all I could instead of, what could I have done.

The vet says it is probably something that has been there since birth and I just didn't see it, but I am certain I would have seen it before now, it's not like you can miss it.

Any suggestions would be helpful. At this point I am contiuning to give her the eye ointment. I thought I would post again and wait for response before I discontinued using it.

Thanks,
Rhonda Green
Alpacas at Bear Creek
Astoria, OR.
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Always Accoyo

1347 Posts

Posted - 10/25/2006 :  3:39:50 PM  Show Profile
If another vet is available, or an animal eye specialist, I would get a second opinion. It can't hurt, and if it comes back with the same answer at least that will give you peace of mind that you have done all you can.

Nancy Wright
Always Accoyo
Oxford, MI
alpacas@alwaysaccoyo.com
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renfarms

442 Posts

Posted - 10/25/2006 :  4:42:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit renfarms's Homepage
Rhonda,
In recent months, there was a television program entitled "Animal MD's" At least that's the name I think it was called. It was broadcast on the National Geographic channel. One of the episodes which aired included a segment where surgery was performed to remove the cataract(s) from a young alpaca. The surgery was successful.
The surgery is nearly identical to the one performed on humans. I have no idea on the price for the surgery, or the availability of a vet who specializes in animal ophthalmology in your area. I believe the vet hospital in the show was in Canada or the Pacific Northwest of the US (ran by pretty fast in the credits!). But it can be done.
I agree with those recommending that you get a second opinion.
Regards,
Bill

Bill and Louise Goebel
Renaissance Farms
McArthur, Ohio 45651
(740) 596-1468
renfarms@starband.net
www.alpacanation.com/renaissancefarms.asp
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nyala

3320 Posts

Posted - 10/25/2006 :  6:37:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit nyala's Homepage
I have received a number of cases of cataracts for my DNA bank. One did cataract surgery and it recurred, and the other eye developed cataracts as well. They had a second cria out of the same dam (now retired from the breeding program because of this) that also had bilateral cataracts. They do not intend to treat it. They are not blind, but cannot really see anything specific. They said they are both doing fine in their herd. Just one case. Obviously they did the surgery because they thought it would fix it. Just passing this on because it cost alot of money and was pointless in this particular case,.
Best of luck. Do consider sending blood samples in for the Camelid DNA bank from the dam sire and cria.
Andy Merriwether
Nyala Farm Alpacas
and
Binghamton University


quote:
Originally posted by renfarms

Rhonda,
In recent months, there was a television program entitled "Animal MD's" At least that's the name I think it was called. It was broadcast on the National Geographic channel. One of the episodes which aired included a segment where surgery was performed to remove the cataract(s) from a young alpaca. The surgery was successful.
The surgery is nearly identical to the one performed on humans. I have no idea on the price for the surgery, or the availability of a vet who specializes in animal ophthalmology in your area. I believe the vet hospital in the show was in Canada or the Pacific Northwest of the US (ran by pretty fast in the credits!). But it can be done.
I agree with those recommending that you get a second opinion.
Regards,
Bill

Bill and Louise Goebel
Renaissance Farms
McArthur, Ohio 45651
(740) 596-1468
renfarms@starband.net
www.alpacanation.com/renaissancefarms.asp



D. Andrew Merriwether, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Anthropology and Biology
Binghamton Univeristy
and
Nyala Farm Alpacas
Vestal, NY
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cyburham

539 Posts

Posted - 10/25/2006 :  11:52:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit cyburham's Homepage
Andy what exactly are you looking for in the DNA bank. Do you just collect for defects? while I don't have any major defects here we did have a male that had to have a small hernia repaired. Would you want any info on minor things like this?

Cindy Burningham
Mountain Top Alpacas
7586 West Mountain Top Road
Herriman,Utah 84065
801 254-5627
cyburham@comcast.net
http://www.alpacanation.com/mountaintop.asp
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nyala

3320 Posts

Posted - 10/26/2006 :  12:02:56 AM  Show Profile  Visit nyala's Homepage
I am collecting DNAs for ALL traits. Ideally, for any trait, try to get the dam and sire of the animal that has the trait too. Any additional blood relatives help. I need ARI numbers to build the pedigree. I have several umbilical hernia pedigrees, so the sample(s) would be welcome. No way to know if it is genetic, but you can't even find out unless you collect 50+ pedigrees. Call for participation with instructions is pasted in below.
Cheers,
andy

Call for Participation:
I have started a DNA bank for future use mapping potentially genetic diseases and phenotypic traits in alpacas and other camelids. Now that the alpaca genome project is almost finished, we will have at least a rough road map of the alpaca genome to start searching for genes involved in camelid health, disease, and various phenotypes. To this end I thought it would be prudent to start banking blood samples from any animals that have any unusual traits, or are born with defects (even born dead). I am currently funded by ARF to map the genes map the Suri allele with the goal of developing genetic tests to offer the industry. I have grants in review to map the gene(s) for choanal atresia, wry face, and polydactyly. If I can accumulate enough samples (blood or tissue, and fiber), I will submit grants to map other traits as well. I am using the data collected already to map coat and skin color and pattern in camelids as well. To do all this, I need blood or tissue samples from the animals with the traits under study, as well as from the dam and sire (if possible), and any other blood relatives. This would all be strictly confidential. I have already received over 150 blood and tissue samples, but will need 50-100 cases and their parents for each trait to map any of these. This is for all camelids, and my bank includes llamas, camels, and guanacos. The animals do not have to be registered. It would help me to have any vet information describing the condition, and if any of the animals (affected or not) have ARI or CLCC numbers it would help me to have them as well. Again, this is strictly confidential. I am not restricting it to the problems listed here. I have collected samples from animals with multiple limbs, conjoined twins, animals with nursing problems, heart murmers, crooked tails, short thick ears. I am interest in any unique traits in alpacas. In general, I am interested in any potentially disease-related phenotypes or unusual non-disease-related phenotypes (traits). Since I am also mapping genes for coat color, and every animal has a color, if you have a group of related animals and wish to participate, I am happy to accept samples. Every little bit helps. I will be happy to talk to anyone about this on the phone or by email. Phone at home is 607-785-8226. Lab is 607-777-6707. Email is andym@binghamton.edu

For now, I am establishing this registry with my own funds (ie doing the extractions from blood and tissue samples and storing them at -80C). If enough samples materialize, I will be able to apply for funding to help pay for this. For now, it is based on your generosity to spend the money to draw the bloods and mail them to me. Blood should be in a lavender top tube (EDTA Vacuutainer) , ideally 1-6 mls. It should be overnight mailed to me (ideally) within 72 hours of drawing it. It should be refrigerated (not frozen) until it is mailed, and can be sent with a blue-ice pack or room temperature if it is not too hot. You need to email me to warn me it is coming, and all related paperwork should accompany the samples, which should be labeled clearly so I know what is what. Also include your name and contact information in the package.

Express mail to:
D. Andrew Merriwether Lab
Department of Biology
Binghamton University
210 Science III Bldg.
Parkway East
PO Box 6000
Binghamton, NY 13902-6000
Lab Phone: 607-777-6707

Final note: If you have a cria that has died, I can DNA from any kind of tissue sample, the placenta, even fiber samples (although the yield from fiber is quite poor). Please ask you vet to save blood or tissue from any cria that dies or is euthanized.

Background on me:
I am currently an associate professor of anthropology and biology at Binghamton University (since 2002). I have a BA in Medical Anthropology, a BS in Biology, an MS in Genetics, a Ph.D. in Human Genetics, and three years postdoctoral training at the Keck Center for Advanced Training in Computational Biology. I was an assistant professor in two departments and two centers at the University of Michigan from 1996-2002 (Anthropolgy, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, the Center for Statistical Genetics, and the Center for Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases (MACEPID)).

With my wife, Ann Merriwether (Faculty in Psychology Dept. and in the School of Human Development at Binghamton University), I co-own Nyala Farm Alpacas, where we currently have 22 alpacas (21 Huacayas and a demonstration model Suri, with four more due this year). We have owned alpacas for about three years now. I have served on the Alpaca Research Foundation Board of directors, the ARI genetics committee under Shauna Brummet, and the Breed Standards Committee for the Empire Alpaca Association. Ann and I have written numerous articles on alpaca genetics for various alpaca and camelid trade journals.

Conflict of Interest: I hope to develop commercial tests to test for the presence of various traits and diseases that I think will benefit the industry and be desirable to alpaca owners and breeders. I also hope some of them will benefit me financially someday as well, but if not, I love solving a good mystery.

quote:
Originally posted by cyburham

Andy what exactly are you looking for in the DNA bank. Do you just collect for defects? while I don't have any major defects here we did have a male that had to have a small hernia repaired. Would you want any info on minor things like this?

Cindy Burningham
Mountain Top Alpacas
7586 West Mountain Top Road
Herriman,Utah 84065
801 254-5627
cyburham@comcast.net
http://www.alpacanation.com/mountaintop.asp



D. Andrew Merriwether, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Anthropology and Biology
Binghamton Univeristy
and
Nyala Farm Alpacas
Vestal, NY
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sherih

399 Posts

Posted - 10/26/2006 :  12:47:54 PM  Show Profile  Visit sherih's Homepage
I did a very quick check on the abchomeopathy.com page. Since I didn't have all of the facts all I entered was cataract. The result was Causticum, probably a 30C dose.

You can go to the site yourself and enter all of the symptoms and you might get more choices. You can read about each suggested remedy there and make your decision. There are almost never any side effects from using homeopathy because it's not a chemically made drug.

The link is http://abchomeopathy.com/go.php. The remedies are available at health food stores or online. They are very inexpensive.


Sheri Hewitt
Woodland Meadows, LLC
Creswell, OR
541-895-0964
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The Paca Factory

592 Posts

Posted - 10/26/2006 :  3:47:33 PM  Show Profile  Visit The Paca Factory's Homepage
I have made a copy of your thread and will be more then happy to participate. I will study this and talk to my vet whom is a camilid vet. She also is very involved with goat reasearch and so I am sure she will work with me to get all that you need with not only my animals but maybe others. I'm very interested in what you are doing. Linda

David & Linda Bradley
The Paca Factory
Durand, Mi.
989-288-3315
thepacafactory@aol.com
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