AlpacaNation

The Original
Online Alpaca Marketplace
Alpaca Forum at AlpacaNation
Alpaca Forum at AlpacaNation
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Alpaca Discussion Forums
 1. Alpacas 101: Getting Started
 Separating and shelter concerns
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

ElkCreekAlpacas

10 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2015 :  10:01:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I am very new to this and when we initially bought our registered ones...a neighbor ended up asking if we would also take their non registered ones since the wife was ill and unfortunately she passed after we agreed to accept them. We have been diligently trying to match them all up appropriately since we have two registered herdsires. So, yesterday when the storm hit we were trying to get our alpacas separated in order for them all to have appropriate shelters. We have some that can't be together because of bloodline and breed. My concerns are the females we separated that came from our neighbor do not seem to want to be separated. They all ended up standing out in the storm looking at each other by the fence that separated them. I don't know if they will eventually be ok...or if we should just put them all together even though I really don't want too many pet alpacas...we want to continue breeding ones we can register. The original owner could not give me correct information on three of the six girls...and from what it seems to me after trying to get them separated...I would say that at least four of them are daughters of the oldest one because she would make little cry noises to them...not sure if this is an accurate assumption though. If anyone has any information or have had similar experiences...I would be more than appreciative for the advice! Thanks!!!

Kate

319 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2015 :  1:07:00 PM  Show Profile  Visit Kate's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thank you for taking in alpacas in need!
First off, males should be separated from the females. Breedings should be done individually, by hand, so you control who breeds whom and when. I am thinking you are trying pen breeding, since it sounds like you're dividing registered females from unregistered?
There is a very strong bond between mothers and daughters, and they should definitely be kept together! Mothers, grandmothers and older sisters babysit and take care of the youngsters- this is a vital herd dynamic that needs to be respected. Stress of separation long term will cause health problems and fiber breakage- you will end up with unusable fleeces. Whether or not they are registered really only has bearing when you are putting together breedings. There really is no reason to breed unregistered animals, unless you are only wanting to produce a fiber herd.
If you keep the males with the girls you want bred, you will be losing babies born at the wrong time of year, in bad weather with no grazing for dams, and lack of being able to predict births.
Can the breeder you bought from mentor you? If not, I would suggest trying to foster a relationship with a good breeder in your area. Experience is priceless, and is worth the price of a breeding, etc, to seed a relationship!

Kate McKelvie
Alpacas of Sunset Fields
Glen Rock, PA
Www.alpacanation/sunsetfields.asp
Go to Top of Page

ElkCreekAlpacas

10 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2015 :  2:09:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks so much for your response...I think I'm understanding it a little better. I will change the arrangement and put those girls back together. We were thinking of mid April to start breeding...this was just an unexpectedly bad storm that made us think to do it a little sooner.
Go to Top of Page

Christiane

2830 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2015 :  5:14:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There is only a need to keep the males separate from the females. All females, registered or not, can be kept together with their babies. I keep all 19 of mine together, and the only time they are not, is when they are being shorn, or a mom and her baby need to be penned for bonding for a short time, like a day or so, but still next to, where they can see each other, the other girls.

I don't know where you are located, but if you are near me, I am an official Mentoring Farm, and love to help other farms out whenever I can. I am in S. W. Ohio about 45 minutes east of Cincinnati. you can email me, or call. I have a site on AN, AlpacaStreet, and Open Herd, so just look for Tanglewood Farm on any of those.

Christiane Rudolf
Tanglewood Farm
19741 Victory Lane
Fayetteville, Ohio 45118
(513) 875-2533
Go to Top of Page

Judith

4103 Posts

Posted - 04/04/2015 :  06:34:47 AM  Show Profile  Send Judith a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Hi Lisa - It will help if you add a signature block to your posts so we know where you are. Responses to questions are very often dependent upon region. You can do this by clicking on your Profile link above and inputting a signature block in the appropriate blank, check the box to have your block automatically inserted every time you post, and click Save.

That said, Christiane and Kate are right. You only need to separate males from females, and bring together each individual male and female for breeding when you're ready. That way you know who has bred whom, and when to expect delivery (although, I confess, they tend to deliver on their own schedule, having never read the book that gives gestation dates). If you're having trouble telling apart the registered ones from the unregistered ones, you may need the prior owner to help you sort them out and then microchip, ear tag or tattoo each one so you know which animal is which when it comes time for injections, wormings and breedings, or if you need a health certificate for travel.

Judith Korff
LadySong Farm
Randolph, NY 14772
Cell: (716) 499-0383
www.alpacanation.com/ladysong.asp
Go to Top of Page

ElkCreekAlpacas

10 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2015 :  10:05:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you guys...Our farm is in Taylorsville, Ky...and I do plan to try and go to the farm in Springfield on Friday to learn the shearing and fiber market part of things.

Right now, I have the four registered girls on one side of the field separated by a fence to where the other five girls are...(we may still be able to get at least two of them registered) We have my favorite male in with them and they seem to be fine and uninterested at the moment. Our other male is in his own pen where he can see all of them.

I know everyone is saying to keep the males separate from the females...but my husband is disagreeing with me (and everyone apparently) about this. He thinks it's ok to let nature take it's course and let them choose what they want to do. The way we have it now...if they are bred, we will know who they would be bred by. However, as I said...they don't seem to be interested in him. My husband thinks it's because they saw how the two males fought prior to having to separate them and since my favorite was not the dominant one...they aren't interested. I hate to believe this...but, they do tend to stand near the fence and look out toward the one we have penned by himself.

I am really frustrated because I can't seem to get my husband to quit comparing our alpacas to deer, etc...



Go to Top of Page

ElkCreekAlpacas

10 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2015 :  10:09:05 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm not sure how to add a signature block...or if you just type the info in at the bottom.


Lisa & Raymond Revard

ElkCreekAlpacas
Taylorsville, Kentucky 40071

ElkCreekAlpacas@yahoo.com

Edited by - ElkCreekAlpacas on 04/07/2015 10:10:19 AM
Go to Top of Page

Judith

4103 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2015 :  3:19:46 PM  Show Profile  Send Judith a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Hi Lisa -- please tell your husband that there is a big physiological difference between alpacas and deer. Male alpacas have very long penises that extend directly into the female's uterus during breeding. The tip of the penis scrapes the walls of the uterus, which can cause scarring and infections, and can lead to the female becoming unable to conceive or, if she does, unable to carry a cria to term. You can spend a great deal of money on vet bills dealing with uterine infections if females are subjected to frequent breedings, which is why we always allow a female to rest a week in between breedings. That helps the internal walls to heal. The other problem, of course, is that if a female is pregnant and is forced down by an aggressive male, she can lose her pregnancy - again with potential resulting internal damage. It is not a good idea to allow unfettered access by males to females.

As to the sig block, click on the "profile" link. There is a place there to type in a signature block. Then click on the box to tell the program to automatically put your signature block on each post, and then click Save.

Judith Korff
LadySong Farm
Randolph, NY 14772
Cell: (716) 499-0383
www.alpacanation.com/ladysong.asp
Go to Top of Page

ard

1844 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2015 :  5:35:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Judith is correct. It is not a good idea to keep the males with the females. There is also potential for the male to injure the penis. (Maybe that will get your husband's attention.)


Robin Alpert
Alpacas 'R Diamonds
15163 W 323rd
Paola, KS 66071
913-849-3738
www.alpacanation.com/alpacasrdiamonds.asp
Go to Top of Page

KT

639 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2015 :  06:32:09 AM  Show Profile  Visit KT's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Lisa,

Have your husband consider this as well. A breeding in March and early April will likely mean a birth in late Feb/early March next year. How warm is your Feb? You want a baby born on a cold winter day when you are not home? It will not likely survive. We have all had "oops" breedings due to gate breaks, etc, but it doesn't make much sense to set yourself up for trouble.
Have fun with your new farm members.

Kate

Beech Springs Alpacas
126 Arthur Majette Rd
Aulander, NC 27805
252-332-5642
252-333-9457 (c)
Go to Top of Page

Judith

4103 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2015 :  08:24:43 AM  Show Profile  Send Judith a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Another reason not to base your breeding practices on wildlife like deer is that deer have "seasons" when the females become receptive and males go into rut. Out of season, the males do not live with the females, but rather wander a territory they mark as their own. Males and females only come together for mating at specific periods of the year. So even Mother Nature knows to separate males from females except at breeding time.

Alpacas, on the other hand, are induced ovulators, which means that the female can be impregnated at any time during the year. Alpaca females have cycles of approximately 7 days during which their hormone levels rise and fall, and they are therefore capable of becoming receptive on a regular basis. You simply cannot treat one species the same way you treat another.

Judith Korff
LadySong Farm
Randolph, NY 14772
Cell: (716) 499-0383
www.alpacanation.com/ladysong.asp
Go to Top of Page

ElkCreekAlpacas

10 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2015 :  10:48:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you all so much for your input...it has been more than helpful and I will be more aggressive with making sure things are done right!! I appreciate you all
Go to Top of Page

Christiane

2830 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2015 :  4:12:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Have your husband read these posts, and if that does not work, have a vet who knows alpacas, tell him. It it a very bad idea to leave females with a male. In addition, you won't know at all when the deed was done, so will not have a clue as to possible deliveries. As Kate also mentioned, it is not a good idea to have winter babies, unless you are in a warm climate. Kentucky has pretty much the same temperatures as I do here in S. W. Ohio, and it is the winter that has me breeding only in the late sping here. No more winter/fall babies at Tanglewood. It is too much work for the farmer, and often results in smaller crias-=-that is, if they survive.

Christiane Rudolf
Tanglewood Farm
19741 Victory Lane
Fayetteville, Ohio 45118
(513) 875-2533
Go to Top of Page

Kate

319 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2015 :  08:38:52 AM  Show Profile  Visit Kate's Homepage  Reply with Quote
As Christiane did, we stopped breeding for fall babies years ago! So much more worry, having to coat the babies, change to dry coats if they get soaked, or lock them in the barn (which stresses them out,) make sure the dams are getting enough calories to produce enough milk and keep their own weight on- there are so many variables already, we just keep things simple and breed for births during good weather with ample pasture.
Wishing you luck and simple deliveries,

Kate McKelvie
Alpacas of Sunset Fields
Glen Rock, PA
Www.alpacanation.com/sunsetfields.asp
Go to Top of Page

josebeth1

109 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2015 :  1:15:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Kate!
And don't forget the best part about winter babies--when you end up with a bottle baby, born right at the start of the worst 3 months of the year
Having done that two different winters (both times, same dam who was basically dumped on me, sigh--long story!) well, I wouldn't wish that on anyone! How I remember the snow being higher than my waist, trying to open the gate, keep the bottle warm in my coat long enough, and my wonderful pyr basically pulling me through the snow and helping me get to the barn......nope, never ever again will I get talked into winter babycare!

Beth Dominguez
Crias del Cielo Alpaca Farm
Hudson, OH
Go to Top of Page

ElkCreekAlpacas

10 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2015 :  1:02:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That definitely doesn't sound like any fun at all!
Go to Top of Page

Christiane

2830 Posts

Posted - 06/13/2015 :  2:22:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just to add another reason for not having winter babies: I had two, and both were found frozen to death in the barn shortly after they were born.

Christiane Rudolf
Tanglewood Farm
19741 Victory Lane
Fayetteville, Ohio 45118
(513) 875-2533
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
Jump To:
Alpaca Forum at AlpacaNation © 2000 - 2009 AlpacaNation LLC Go To Top Of Page
Snitz Forums 2000

WELCOME TO ALPACANATION

Our family has 8,928 breeders, with more joining every day.

Join Now!